Creating a production schedule

I’m not sure if there are other terms that apply to what I refer to as my production schedule. But my definition is my plan for upcoming writing projects mapped out through 2012.

My schedule hinges on my ability to write 2k words toward my novels per day, every day. I’m not giving myself any planned days off because I don’t really feel like I need them. Writing is not a chore for me. It’s something I enjoy doing and I can knock out 2000 words without too much effort. If I do miss a day due to life getting in the way, I’ll just add those missed days onto another day. It’s the end result that counts. I did this with I Wish… with great results.

I used the Curio software to set up my schedule. It allows me to assign due dates to lists. So this is what my schedule looks like for 2012.

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This plan hinges on me being able to do several things at once. I’ll always have something in either a 2 week pre-writing stage or actually being written. Then there will be edits happening as well. At which point I’ll find a pro to give my drafts a final polish. I haven’t factored in hiring a cover artist, this only covers the things I’ll be doing myself. I’ll probably work with someone while I’m writing the story since I’ll know from my outlining what will happen in the story. Depending on the turn around time with the editor, I should have these books up within a few weeks after I finish my round of edits.

As you can see, you can expect the Witches of Desire trilogy to be done by next January. I figure that should give me some breathing room in between projects to keep up my enthusiasm for the project. This is a tentative schedule. I plan to keep flexible on what projects I tackle. If I’m not feeling it when it comes time to work on something, I’ll either swap it with something due later in the year or take on a new project altogether. This schedule isn’t meant to stifle me, just hold me account able to a certain level of productivity.

The novels aren’t the only thing I’ll be working on. I have my short fiction under my pen name that I’ll be writing simultaneously. Also at a pace of 2k words a day. Each story averages about 4.5k words. My plan is to write 3 stories a week that I’ll upload on Monday, Wednesdays, and Fridays. On Saturdays I’ll spend some time coming up with story ideas for the week and creating the covers so when it’s time to upload them, all I have to do is format and go.

This is a pretty ambitious year. I do expect that I’ll come up short on the stories because there’s not much room for error and my life is full of socializing with the other girls on the derby team, as well as more serious commitments to the team. On top of that, I have a family which includes my young minions. Summer vacation will play havoc with my carefully structured schedule, I have no doubt. The novels I feel a little bit better about. Since I work from strict outlines, there’s not a lot of on the spot creative thinking necessary. I can do that with kids arguing in the background. I’ve done it before.

So you want to know how I came up with this schedule so you can make your own?

Come up with a daily/weekly word goal

What’s reasonable for you? I went with 4k on a daily basis because I feel like it’s not much of a strain. I don’t work outside the home. Writing IS my job so it’s not unreasonable to expect myself to put in a full day’s work doing it. It’s enough to challenge me, which I think is a good thing to strive for, but I don’t run much of a risk of burn out since I’ll be working across several projects at a time. Figure out what a good number is for you. Challenge yourself, but don’t make it impossible to achieve.

Determine the length of your projects

My shorts are ~4.5k words each and my novels are being planned at 90k each. 90k/2k = 45 days. Or about 6 weeks. 2 weeks of outlining seems reasonable to me since I’ll be working on that unofficially during the time leading up to them. I LOVE that part of writing, so I’ll think about it for fun. By the time I’m ready to start a project I’ll already have a really good idea of what I’m looking at.

Mark it on your calendar

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This is what my February is going to look like. It seems pretty chaotic in the overview, but by taking it day by day, I don’t think it’ll seem so overwhelming. Other things to add would be any anthologies to which you contribute, contest dates, submissions to traditional agents/publishers (if that’s your thing), and other writing projects. Write it down and then live by your calendar.

Hold yourself accountable

When I wrote I Wish… I kept a daily word tracking log. It told me exactly how many words I’d written that day, how many words I’d written total, and how many I had left to meet my goal. It was motivating to watch my word count slowly grow. I’m still debating about how I plan to keep track this time around. I’ll probably just start a couple of lists with Curio and add the date and the number of words I wrote that day for each project. I won’t stress about daily totals as long as I’m good about finishing my weekly goals (4k a day or 28k a week).

Don’t go easy on yourself. When you are an indie writer you don’t answer to anybody but yourself. Oh sure, your fans are going to want to know when they can expect the next book, but believe me, no matter how much you want to give it to them, if you aren’t motivated internally, it’s not going to happen. You won’t be fired if you don’t finish your manuscript by a certain date. These are your goals so you need to be the one making sure you meet them.

Stick with it

This is going to be the hard part. It’s easy to make goals, but something else all together to stick with it until you get the results you want. If you fail to meet your goal one day, or a week, or even a month, don’t just throw in the towel and give it up as a lost cause. Either reevaluate your goals since maybe you were being too ambitious or, if you’re sure your goals are reasonable and it was a just a weak moment on your part, pick it up again and carry on. Don’t beat yourself up over past mistakes. Self loathing isn’t going to get your books written. Put it behind you and try again.

Are you planning to set up a production schedule for 2012? Let me know and we can try to help each other stay motivated to stick it out.

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